Friday, April 18, 2014

Dekh Tamasha Dekh, Hindi Bollywood Film Movie review, Johnson Thomas, Rating: *  *  *
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Dekh Tamasha Dekh(Hindi) Rating: *  *  * communal politics and warring religious communities front this  socio-political satire, which is as such, tone deaf but has enough drama to keep you engaged.
                                                                                     
                                                                     
Hindi Film review           
Johnson Thomas             
Film: Dekh Tamasha Dekh : Ironic and Telling
Cast: Satish Kaushik, Vinay jain, Tanvi Azmi, Sharad Ponkshe, Dhiresh Joshi, Satish Alekar,Apoorva Arora, Alok Rajawade
Director:Feroz Abbas Khan
Rating: *  *  *

Feroz Abbas Khan, the prolific and noted theatre director who ventured into films a few years ago with ‘Gandhi My Father’ returns with ‘Dekh Tamasha Dekh’ a socio-political satire that highlights the demons of communalism and religious fundamentalism. Based on a play, this Shafat Khan adaptation, works on multiple levels as an ominous portend of things to come if we allow ourselves to be waylaid by religion politics.

This film acts as a pointer to the decay in political discourse today. The over dependence on aggression and hate-mongering and the conscienceless chipping away at vote-banks in order to ensure political supremacy. Caught in the midst of this is a hapless Police officer(Vinay Jain), newly transferred, who has to adjucate the religious affiliation of a corpse felled by a giant hoarding of Mitha(Satish Kaushik) , a local businessman and hustler standing for elections in this volatile coastal  township  somewhere in Maharashtra.  The rabid hindu community wants the body to be cremated as per Hindu rites while the strident muslim community seeks it’s burial. The court is drawn into the macabre melee and for want of substantive proof decides to hand it over to the brother of the deceased, a low-caste hindu. While riots erupt, the cop manages to steal the body away and hand it over to the brother who gets it buried, as per the low-caste hindu custom.
Heavy on irony but low on farce and humor, the plotting also encapsulates a doomed romance between a hindu boy and a muslim girl (Alok and Apoorva)and casts aspersions on her mother(A stoic and stunningly poignant Tanvi Azmi) who is the widow of the man deceased and is deemed to have used her wiles to sway him to the muslim faith. A historian (Satish Alekar) whose account of history is being burned, tries to broker sense in the backdrop of confrontational angst while an idealistic editor(Dhiresh Joshi) is forced to re-examine his values and a constable roams the streets in search of a bitch who appears to have gone astray. 
 In an opening that is both loud and obnoxious, the constable is being instructed by his senior to go in search of the bitch who got away. Meant to be humorous but pitifully overdone to resemble farce, this track is the most disappointing  and aggravating of an otherwise lucid and intriguing diorama that is a telling denouement on today’s politics and politicians. The immersive engagement is due mainly because of  smartly juxtaposed contretemps which tear-off the masks from the faces, revealing a rot that is deep seated and bordering on lunacy. The performances are all thoroughly tangible making the experience that much more intriguing.

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