Naya Pata, Hindi Bhojpuri film movie review, Johnson Thomas, Rating: *

Naya Pata, Hindi Bhojpuri film movie review, Johnson Thomas, Rating: *

#PawanKSrivastav #SaurabhRathore #ShiladityaBora #PVRPictures #MoesArt 

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Hindi film Review
Johnson Thomas   
    
 More like Lapata!      

   
Film: Naya Pata
Cast: Abhishek Sharma,Shahid Ahmad,Yashwardhan Singh, Julie Warsi,Chandra Nisha,Madhuri
Director: Pawan K Srivastav


Rating: *


Crowd-funded with a budget of a mere Rs. 12 lakhs, this film is a surprise mainly for it’s economics and marketability. The content and craft is another matter altogether.

Pawan K Srivastav has written the script and directed the film on the serious subject of migration,  largely with newcomers and it’s done in a language(Bhojpuri) popularly known for it’s sleazy double-entendre cinematic sojourns. So in a way, he has broken new ground. His attempt, may not be all that honorable though. It’s mostly a given, that if you make a half-way decent film in one of the Indian languages with miniscule cinematic representation then rewards are forthcoming both from the state and central governments. At the back of his mind, must have been the possibility of tapping into such a revered resource to gain profitability as well as recognition for his team. Smart thinking I say!
But that’s as smart as this film gets. In terms of story and plotting it’s mostly a sea of unfinished promises. The film appears to have been interested (that’s what the Press release says) in establishing a recognition of one’s identity through the process of migration and conscious reverse migration. In effect the  protagonist leaves his wife and son in his home town, Chapra, Bihar and moves to New Delhi to work in a lawyer’s office. Following his wife’s death he decides to return to his home where his son and daughter-in-law now reside only to see his son going off to Nasik in search of better prospects. But by trying to ensure that his son doesn’t fall for the same folly as his, he leaves himself open to a life of loneliness and despair.




There’s not much movement in the plotting. The gaps are filled up with folk songs and a fitfully resounding background score that belies more than it conveys. The storyline itself is underdeveloped and lacks conviction. The plotting is peppered with pointless sequences and unaccomplished stretches of sound and song. There’s little imagination on display here. Instead of evoking pathos, poignancy and pain, the narrative invokes confusion. There probably was some method in the format but as a viewer you wouldn’t be able to figure it out. For a freshman effort, this one is just about Ok!  

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